Fall 2020 courses

HIS 101 Heerman HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, I

THIS COURSE REQUIRES A DISCUSSION SECTION

When and where does U.S. History begin? This survey course begins by studying New World colonialism to trace the rise of an “American experience” in North America.  The course will examine how the meeting of European societies, African societies, and Indigenous societies adapted to new environments and merged into a distinctly “American” society. This course will explore how these diverse groups interacted with each other, made new societies, and destroyed old ones. Guiding our inquiry, we will trace how the concept of “a citizen” came to define the early nation, and how conflicts over citizenship rights in time led to sectional conflict and a bloody Civil War. In the end, we will study the connections between a long history of colonialism and the rise of U.S. citizenship to understand how various groups participated in, and were excluded from, the making of the American nation.

HIS 131 Gunther EUROPE FROM ANTIQUITY TO 1600: AN EXPANDING WORLD

MW 3:35pm-4:25pm 

THIS COURSE REQUIRES A DISCUSSION SECTION

This course tells the dramatic story of the first 5,000 years of Western Civilization, beginning in the ancient Near East and ending with Europe and its global empires in the seventeenth century.  Lectures will focus on topics such as: the invention of writing in ancient Mesopotamia; life in Greek city states like Athens and Sparta; the rise and fall of the Roman empire; the development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; the symbolism and significance of architectural monuments like the pyramids and gothic cathedrals; society and culture in Europe during the middle ages; the Crusades; the Renaissance and Protestant Reformation; and the discovery of the New World.  Weekly discussions will focus on short readings from historical documents that reveal the aspirations, attitudes, and experiences of the people we will be studying.  This course counts towards the “Western Civilization: Historical Approaches” and “History of Early Modern Europe” cognates.

HIS 161 Nesvig HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA, I (TO 1824)

TR 9:30am10:45am

This course is a broad survey of Latin American peoples from the pre-Hispanic period to the eighteenth century.  The principal themes of the course are cultural, intellectual, religious, and social developments in broad geographic and epochal contexts.  A region that experienced the contact and interaction of peoples from the Americas, Iberia, and Africa resulted in a highly diverse, wide ranging mosaic of political structures, cultural patterns, social rules, and religious systems.  Topics may include: pre-contact groups; Spanish conquest; demographic collapse; missionary religious activities; debates on the legitimacy of the conquest; religious syncretism; African slavery and diaspora; sugar and plantations; food and agriculture; women and gender; Indian and Iberian cultural interaction; trans-Atlantic trade and navigation.  While the course will cover a wide a range of areas, regions of topical focus will include Mexico, the Spanish Caribbean, the Andean highlands, and Brazil.  The course will also develop themes of trade, piracy, social development, and ethnic mixture through case studies of cities like Santo Domingo, Cartagena, Potosí, Buenos Aires, and Bogotá.

HIS 201 Abaka History of Africa I (to 1800)

TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

This course is designed to give students a general understanding of the history of pre-colonial Africa (Africa before 1800).  It will give prominence to the sources available for the study of African history, the historical geography of Africa, social and economic institutions.  This is designed to facilitate students’ understanding of the different marriage, family, and kinship systems in African countries.  African political institutions will also be discussed through an analysis of state systems-Egypt, Kush, Meroe, Ghana, Mali, Songhai etc., and non-state systems.  The course also examines African economic activities to show the connections between trade, state formation, and decline of states.  Slavery, the slave trade, and its impact on the continent will be thoroughly explored to delineate the creation of the African Diaspora in Europe, the Caribbean and the Americas.  The last segment of the course discusses African Religion, Islam, Christianity and European missionary activity in Africa. 

 

HIS 210 Spivey AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1877-PRESENT

TR 6:35pm-7:50pm

History 210 is a spirited exploration of those factors that have shaped and been shaped by people of African descent in the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present.    Some of the critical issues we will examine are:  black life under Jim Crow, the impact of industrial and technological development on black Americans, the African-American educational experience and the rise of HBCUs, leadership in the black community, the evolution and impact of ideologies from accommodatiomism and integration to Black Nationalism, the African-American exodus and urban experience, the cultural life of the community in the era of the Harlem Renaissance, the modern Civil Rights Movement and its aftermath, and the current state of African America.

The student’s grade for the course will be based on the following:       

  • Four book analyses of three pages each (12.5% each; 50%).   
  • Participation in class discussion of required readings will count for extra credit. 
  • No midterm examination.
  • A comprehensive in-class essay final examination (50%) based upon lectures, readings, and documentaries. 

Please make special note that under no circumstances will late work be accepted nor the grade of incomplete (I) given.  Electronic submissions (email attachments and faxes) are not acceptable.         

     *A service-learning project may be done in lieu of two (2) of the book analyses or for extra credit.  This option does not alter the student’s responsibility to do all of the required reading.

 

HIS 225 Miller HISTORY OF THE MODERN BUSINESS ENTERPRISE

TR 5:05pm-6:20pm

This course examines the evolution of the modern business enterprise over the past two centuries.  It considers the factors that promoted and accompanied the emergence of large business firms, and how these patterns varied in major industrial countries across the world.  The class will divide into three segments.  The first segment takes up the rise and evolution of big business in the United States, from railroad building; specific business histories of the steel, oil, and automobile industries; and the creation of a favorable corporate structure; to wider stories of success and failure in the twentieth century.  A second segment then takes a more global approach to modern business, with particular attention to two alternative business histories to the American experience: those of Japan and Germany (including the role of big business in Nazi-occupied Europe).  In this segment we also look at the international banking networks of the Rothschilds; the rise of global business, either through multinational expansion or the construction of global networks of shipping and trade; and we examine how containerization revolutionized global transport.  A third segment concentrates on three consumer-oriented business histories:  fashion and beauty culture companies; mass marketing retail companies from department stores to Wal-Mart; and the new high-tech sector, like Apple, that emerged with the information technology revolution.  Throughout the course we will focus on the history of individual firms as examples, but we will also consider how those histories were rooted in larger historical contexts and how business has been an agent of modern society.

HIS 229 Elena CONSUMER SOCIETY: A GLOBAL HISTORY

TR 9:30-10:45

In the United States we are surrounded today with a seemingly limitless variety of consumer goods, and we are offered constant reminders of the increasingly globalized nature of modern life.  Too often, however, such commentary reflects a shocking ignorance about the origins and evolution of contemporary consumer society.  This course seeks a deeper understanding of these transformations by exploring the historical relationship between consumption and globalization.  Spanning a broad arc of time (but with a focus on the twentieth century), the course explores the impact of innovations in agriculture, trade, industrialization, advertising, and culture on everyday life in multiple societies.  The lectures and readings consider cases studies in the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Africa that reveal underlying convergences and divergences worldwide as well as the unresolved social, ethical, and environmental problems associated with consumption.

 

HIS 261 LIPSCHULTZ

WOMEN’S AMERICA I

MW 5:05pm-6:20pm

This course looks at the history of American women from the American Revolution to Reconstruction. We will examine mothers and daughters of the revolution, women and the law of slavery, abolition and women’s rights, the first independent women’s movement and the legal status of women throughout the period.

HIS 266 WHITE THE FOUNDERS: FACT AND FICTION

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Few historical actors have attracted as much attention in the United States as the founders, the group of men—and the occasional woman—who are credited with leading the charge for revolution and establishing a new nation.  In this course we will consider the founders in their eighteenth-century context, examining the

person, or in some cases, a set of people, who opens an interpretative window onto a key moment or theme.  Our readings will consist almost entirely of the founders’ own writings, providing an important portal to their world and a means for reappraising what we thought we knew about the founders.  Finally, we will explore how the founders continue to resonate today, in politics and in the popular imagination.

HIS 267 FRASER MAKING HISTORY MAKING MUSIC

MWF 11:15am-12:05pm

How can music help us understand American history? How do the myriad musical traditions that have developed in the United States shed light on the social and cultural experiences of groups of people who are often overlooked or marginalized in conventional historical narratives? In this course, students will be introduced to one of the more singular and historically significant works of American popular music: the 1952 Anthology of American Folk Music. In exploring the dizzyingly diverse early twentieth-century social worlds captured in the Anthology, as well as its broad-ranging influence on later rock, country, and soul musicians, students will learn how to use musical recordings as tools of historical inquiry and cultural analysis--and will have an opportunity to apply what they learn in creating their own anthology of American music today.

HIS 271 FRASER

AMERICAN POLITICAL HISTORY SINCE 1960: POLICY, PUBLIC HISTORY, AND MODERN MEDIA

MWF 2:30pm-3:20pm

As many as 140 million Americans will likely participate in November's elections--the first in the nation's history to feature an incumbent president who has already been impeached by the Congress. How did we get here? In this course, students will be introduced to the major developments in American political history over the last half-century, providing them a rich framework for understanding and discussing some of the more hotly debated issues at stake in the current election season. Topics will include the civil rights movements of the 1960s and 1970s; the rise of the New Right; neoliberalism and the Great Recession; mass incarceration and the "new Jim Crow"; the growth of white nationalism, and others.

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HIS 310 ABAKA

AFRICA IN CUBA/CUBA IN AFRICA: SLAVE TRADE TO CUBAN INTERNATIONALIST MISSIONS IN AFRICA 

  TR 5:05pm-6:20pm

This course examines the relationship between Cuba and Africa from the period of the slave trade to the late 1990s.  The course is divided into three sections. Section one deals with Cuba and Africa during the period of the slave trade.  It focuses on the forced migration of Africans to Cuba, the contribution of the enslaved to the growth and development of Cuba and the impact of the African presence on the island.  The next section examines the African contribution to the wars of independence and the period of the Republics down to the time of Cuban revolution. It will analyze the contribution of Cuba’s Black population to the revolution and the impact of the revolution on race relations in Cuba. 

In the final section, we shall emphasize Cuba’s Africa policy from the Cuban revolution to the independence of Angola, Mozambique, Guinea Bissau, Cape Verde and Principé.  This section is designed to answer certain fundamental questions: Why did a small country like Cuba play such a preponderant role in Africa during the decolonization period, a time of heightened tensions due to the Cold War between the superpowers?

What exactly did Cuban soldiers do in the Congo, Angola, Mozambique, Guinea Bissau and Cape Verde? Was Cuba a proxy for the Soviet Union or was Fidel Castro pursuing a Cuban agenda? What was the thinking behind Castro’s African policy?  Finally, Cuba trained African youth as doctors, engineers and technicians on the Isle of Youth.  The Cuban-trained African professionals returned to their respective countries in Africa to help rebuild their countries. Their stories have not yet been told and it is our intention to discuss some of their personal stories.

Students are reminded that this is a writing intensive course that involves the use of primary sources in the Cuban Heritage Collection.  Accordingly, we shall spend class time in the Cuban Heritage Collection of the Richter Library.  This is mandatory for all students in the class.

HIS 318 RAMSEY MODERN CARIBBEAN HISTORY

TR 3:30pm-4:45pm

This course will introduce students to major topics, debates, and themes in Caribbean history from the late eighteenth century to the present day. Analyzing primary source documents and images will be a particular emphasis of our work throughout the semester, and on at least two occasions the class will meet in the UM Libraries Cuban Heritage Collection and Special Collections to examine and discuss archival resources connected to our studies.

We will begin with the 1804 Haitian Revolution and its far-reaching effects across the Atlantic world and beyond. Major areas of focus thereafter will include the expansion of the sugarcane economy and slavery in Cuba; the anti-slavery struggles of enslaved peoples and international abolition groups; and emancipation across the Caribbean. We will examine large-scale social movements of the formerly enslaved and their descendants over land, labor, and political representation, and consider the experiences of Indian, Chinese, and African indentured workers in post-emancipation Caribbean societies. 

With the Cuban independence wars against Spain culminating in the Spanish-American War of 1898, we will turn to the United States’ increasing influence and intervention in the Caribbean region as an imperial power. As cases in point, we will examine the U.S. invasions and occupations of Haiti (1915-34) and the Dominican Republic (1916-24) and consider their effects and legacies. As part of our focus on Caribbean social movements during the 1920s and 1930s, we will study the significance of Marcus Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association across the region, and also examine the labor struggles that swept the British Caribbean in the mid-1930s, considering their import for nationalist politics in these societies thereafter.

Cuba under Batista and the 1959 Revolution that brought Fidel Castro to power will be a primary focus of the latter part of the course, as will the study of decolonization and political independence in the former British Caribbean during the Cold War. Our study of the history Puerto Rico’s relationship to the U.S. will open into larger discussions of political status and sovereignty in the Caribbean. Our last meetings will focus on issues facing the contemporary Caribbean and local initiatives and movements addressing them. Throughout the course students will be challenged to recognize the diversity of the region, while thinking comparatively and synthetically about its political, economic, social, cultural, and environmental histories.

HIS 347 GOFF SOVIET UNION AND POST-SOVIET RUSS

MW 5:05pm-6:20pm

Starting with the revolutionary years of the late Russian Empire, we will cover the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the utopian Soviet experiment in the 20th century, as well as the first 30 years of post-Soviet Russia.  Lectures will address some of the following topics: World War One and the revolutions of 1917; Marxism-Leninism;  Stalinism; World War Two; the Cold War; the collapse of the Soviet Union; and the rise and rule of Vladimir Putin. The Soviet Union has been called an “Affirmative Action Empire” and an “Empire of Nations.” Embracing this approach, we will use primary source documents, novels, poems, songs, films, and images to explore the diverse range of daily experiences that comprised this vast multinational state.

HIS 348 MILLER EUROPE IN THE AGE OF HITLER AND STALIN

TR 12:30pm-1:45pm

This course studies European history between 1914 and 1945, or what has also been termed Europe in the age of war and revolution.  Its purpose is to provide students with a continental overview of Europe in its most turbulent and destructive half century.  It begins with the First World War, under whose shadow all Europeans lived until the coming of a Second World War in 1939 replaced it as the dominant experience in their lives.  The course will examine the success of revolutionary movements on the right (fascism) and the left (communism), with particular attention to the rise to power of the Nazis in Germany and the fate of the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia.  It will look at the difficulty for the center (democracy) to hold, examining a variety of experiences from the general strike in Britain, to French crises in the 1930s, to civil war in Spain, and anti-Semitic politics in eastern Europe.  It will also ask why Europeans failed to establish a stabilizing peace and went to war again only twenty years after the worst war in European history.  The final section of the course will focus on the Second World War from a multitude of perspectives: military history, the history of occupation and resistance, and the history of mass murder.

HIS 352 NESVIG THE INQUISITION

TR 12:30pm-1:45pm

Did the Inquisition kill a million witches?  No.  But it did other things involving religious minorities like Albigensians and converted Jews and sometimes persecuted witches but not very often, though it did execute many for having dissident religious beliefs.  The Inquisition is also associated with torture, which it used.  Yet inquisitors believed that torture was ineffective because the torture victim invents a false narrative.  This class examines both the constructed idea of the Inquisition as well as the long history of multiple, distinct inquisitions:  the medieval inquisitions of southern France and parts of Germany and Italy (1220-1400); the Spanish Inquisition (1478-1810); Italian and Roman inquisitions (1500-1700); and inquisitions in the Americas, for example, in Mexico, Brazil, and Peru (1520-1810).  Themes/topics may include:  the Albigensian Crusade; Catharism; the Dominican Order; persecution of sodomites (proto-gays), heretics, dissidents, Jewish converts to Catholicism, mystics, and users of hallucinogens; censorship and control of print; social histories of the inquisition’s role in medieval, early modern, or colonial societies; the role of patronage systems and networks of influence; the pedagogy of fear and the persecuting society.  We will also read the classic microhistory by Carlo Ginzburg, The Cheese and the Worms

HIS 370 BERNATH STORIED PASTS: 19TH-CENTURY U.S. HISTORY AND LITERATURE

TR 2:00pm-3:15pm

This course explores 19th-century American intellectual and cultural history through the lens of literature. Analyzing key works of fiction, poetry, and philosophy as historical sources, we will seek to discover how the changing themes and forms of nineteenth-century literature shaped and/or reflected larger intellectual, political, and social currents. 

HIS 376 LIPSCHULTZ AMERICAN LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY

TR 6:35pm-7:50pm

The development of legal thought and practice in the context of American politics, economy and ideology during the twentieth century. Special consideration will be given to social movements and their treatment under the rule of law.

HIS 397 GUNTHER INTERNSHIP
HIS 400 &500  DIRECTED READINGS

All 400and 500 level directed readings require permission of instructor before signing up for course.

HIS 412 CHATTERJEE

MAHATMA GANDHI AND MARTIN LUTHER KING JR: A CALL TO CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

MWF  9:05am-9:55am

This course will study selected works of M.K. Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. and their legacies and impact in the field of community service and civic engagement.

The class will be organized into three modules – 1) academic learning inside the classroom, 2) work on similar themes in the community, 3) reflections of civic engagement before, during, and after conclusion of modules. Through a detailed study of Gandhi and King’s writings, speeches, archival and visual materials we will explore their theories and praxis of engaged citizenry, and the pursuit of political, social, and economic justice. Students will be paired with a community organization engaged in civic work either on campus or in Miami-Dade county. We will critically study Gandhi’s and King’s philosophy of Non-Violence, its application in differing historical contexts as well specific projects such as “Voting Rights”, “Constructive Work”, “Operation Breadbasket”, “School Desegregation” to explore issues of economic and educational justice, political mobilization, strategies of “passive” resistance, individual and collective responsibilities. This course is an organic interplay of philosophical study of Gandhi and King in the classroom, student engagement with similar (but not identical) issues (of our times) through work with a local community organization, and reflection exercises to understand the process of civic engagement.

HIS511/611 CHATTERJEE Studies in Asian History: ASIANS IN THE US & CARIBBEAN

W 2:00pm-4:30pm

HIS 536/636 THOMAS

STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY: THE CRUSADES

R 2:00pm-4:30pm

This course investigates the theory and practice of Christian holy war in the Middle Ages. It covers the scriptural passages used to justify the wars, the background to the ideology of crusading, and accounts of the wars themselves. Christian, Muslim, and Jewish sources from the Middle Ages will be used as well as more modern works. Though the main focus will be on crusades to the Holy Lands, the readings will also cover crusades against heretics, the Reconquista, and attacks on pagans in northeastern Europe. 40% of the grade will be based on weekly discussions of the assigned readings, 10% will be based on a short paper on an assigned topic, and 50% on a longer research paper on a topic of the student’s choice.

HIS 591 GOFF

STUDIES IN COMPARATIVE HISTORY GLOBAL HISTORY OF GENOCIDE

T 2:00pm-4:30pm

From German colonial atrocities against the Herero and Nama at the turn of the 20th century to Rwanda and Bosnia in the 1990s, mass killings marked every decade and every corner of the globe during this “century of genocide.” Yet, as recent events in Syria and elsewhere have shown, genocidal violence can hardly be isolated to one period in time. This course will help you better understand this dark phenomenon and define its blurry contours. Is genocide a symptom of the modern world? What are the networks, patterns, and characteristics that bind mass killings across the globe into shared systems of violence? What motivates perpetrators to kill, and how do you achieve reconciliation or justice in places scarred by mass death?

HIS 591 WHITE

STUDIES IN COMPARATIVE HISTORY NAVIGATING MATERIAL CULTURE

TR 12:30pm-1:45pm

In this seminar we will work with the library’s world-renowned Kislak Collection, a trove of primary sources related to the age of exploration.  We will examine how the so-called “New World” was represented in maps and other navigational materials as well as the diverse populations—mariners, officials, soldiers, cartographers, the enslaved, and indigenous people—whose knowledge contributed to their fabrication.  Our goal is to understand how these items were made, used, and circulated, and in so doing, how they contributed to creating the early modern Atlantic world.  As part of the course, students will have the opportunity to apply recent mapping technologies (such as StoryMaps) to tell new stories about these old maps.

HIS 716 RAMSEY CARIBBEAN FIELD PREP

  F 2:00pm-4:30pm  

This seminar is designed for Ph.D. students who are interested in working on major topics and questions in eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth-century Caribbean history. Students will have the chance to discuss and place in conversation influential studies on Caribbean slavery and anti-slavery; the Haitian Revolution and its legacies; “second slavery” in Cuba and Puerto Rico; abolitionism and emancipation in the British Caribbean and gradually across the region; struggles on the parts of freed people and their descendants over land, labor, and citizenship; the arrival and experience of indentured migrants in pre- and post-emancipation Caribbean societies; the Cuban independence wars; the U.S. annexation of Puerto Rico and occupations of Cuba, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic; and social movements and intellectual currents across these histories. The seminar will focus on major themes and problems in the historiographical literature, spotlighting longstanding debates and new directions. Methodological problems will be foregrounded throughout, particularly concerning archival power and silence in the study of these histories. Centering on questions of Caribbean freedom, resistance, citizenship, and sovereignty, the seminar is designed to encourage transnational and comparative approaches.

HIS 810

MASTER’S THESIS

The student working on his/her master’s thesis enrolls for credit, in most departments not to exceed six, as determined by his/her advisor.  Credit is not awarded until the thesis has been accepted.                                

HIS 825

MASTER’S STUDY

To establish residence for non-thesis master’s students who are preparing for major examinations.  Credit not granted.  Regarded as full time residence.                   

HIS 830

DOCTORAL DISSERTATION

Required of all candidates for the Ph.D.  The student will enroll for credit as determined by his/her advisor, but for not less than a total of 12 hours.  Up to 12 hours may be taken in a regular semester, but not more than six in a summer session.

HIS 840

POST CAND DOC DISS

HIS 850

RESEARCH IN RESIDENCE

Use to establish research in residence for the Ph.D. after the student has been enrolled for the permissible cumulative total in appropriate doctoral research.  Credit not granted.  May be regarded as full-time residence as determined by the Dean of the Graduate School.