Spring 2021 courses

HIS 102 FRASER HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, II (Since 1877)

MW 1:00pm-1:50pm

THIS COURSE REQUIRES A DISCUSSION SECTION

F 11:45am-12:35pm

F 1:00pm-1:50pm

This course covers a survey of United States history from Reconstruction to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on the meaning of American democracy in the face of myriad inequalities.

HIS 132 MILLER THE BIRTH OF MODERNITY: EUROPE 1648 TO THE PRESENT

MW 10:30am-11:20am

THIS COURSE REQUIRES A DISCUSSION SECTION

F 10:30am-11:20am

This course covers the history of Europe from the seventeenth century to the present. We will begin with the two revolutions that shaped Europe in modern times – the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution – and consider, in the first weeks of the semester, the political, intellectual, and economic conditions that preceded these great catalysts of transition and that also made them possible. Then we will look at the evolving character of Europe in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In the nineteenth century we will explore the power of nationalism and the creation of new states in the heart of Europe (especially the unification of Italy and Bismarck’s unification of Germany), and we will ask whether the growing prosperity and comfort of middle-class culture allows us to identify a “belle époque” in Europe in the last decades before the First World War or an impending sense of crisis. In the last part of the semester we will take up a twentieth-century history of world wars, communism and fascism, and collapse and renewal. The class will meet on Monday and Wednesday for lectures and on Friday for discussion.

HIS 162 ELENA HISTORY OF MODERN LATIN AMERICA (1800-PRESENT)

TR 1:00pm-2:15pm

This course offers an introduction to the history of Latin America from the early nineteenth century to the present.  No prior knowledge of Latin America or its history is required.  Over the semester, students will consider the following broad questions: What do the diverse countries of the vast area that we now call “Latin America” have in common?  How have different ideas of progress and modernization been applied over time in these countries?  How did Latin America become a region celebrated for its enormous material resources and cultural riches, yet also one that contains some of the most unequal societies in the world?  In seeking answers to these complex questions, the course also provides a deeper understanding of the present-day relations between the United States and its southern neighbors, including by considering issues such as migration, the drug trade, and democratization that affect all societies in the Americas.  Through the course assignments, students will hone their talents for historical interpretation, including critical thinking and writing skills that are essential for success at UM (the “hemispheric university”) and after graduation. 
HIS 203 ABAKA THE AFRICAN DIASPORA IN SOUTH FLORIDA 

TR 1:00pm-2:15pm

This course examines the historical experiences of the African Diaspora in South Florida through a close analyses of three junctures in the history of the Black experience: The slave trade, abolition and emancipation; the migration of various African-descended peoples from the Caribbean and Latin America to South Florida; and the more recent arrivals from Africa, either directly or by way of the Caribbean, especially, Ghanaians and Nigerians.  The major themes to be tackled in the time frame include, among others, migration, culture contact, creation of  «new cultures », political activism, including civil rights activism, and the emergence of « new » communities that have enriched the political, economic and social landscape of South Florida. 

HIS 253 NESVIG HISTORY OF MEXICO: GUNS AND TORTILLAS, OR, HOW MEXICO BECAME MEXICAN

TR 2:40pm-3:55pm

This class examines the development of a Mexican identity and exceptionalism.  The focus of the course is on the cultural ideology of modern Mexico and on the political upheavals associated with the 1910 Revolution.  Topics will include: the emergence of Mexican cuisine; ethnicity and politics; social movements; Zapatismo; and radicalism of the Mexican Revolution.  Additionally the course attempts to understand how and why Mexico not only became unique culturally but how that culture uniqueness was developed and promoted in cinema, television, muralists and artists, and an aggressive exportation of the image of Mexican uniqueness to an international market.

HIS 267 WHITE MAKING HISTORY: THE MATERIAL CULTURE OF EARLY AMERICA

The Material Culture of Early America

 MWF 1:00pm-1:50pm

In this seminar we will examine what material culture–objects, architecture, and landscape–can tell us about the lives of people in the past.  We will explore not only various types of material culture, but we will also appraise the ways scholars have approached this unconventional, yet powerful, source base: the questions they have asked, the methods they have used, and the conclusions they have drawn.  Our focus is on the early period of American history (the seventeenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries), and we will work with objects in Richter Library’s Special Collections and the Lowe Art Museum to enrich our studies.

THIS COURSE WILL MEET IN THE LOWE ART MUSEUM AND IS NOT OPEN TO REMOTE LEARNING

HIS 272 NESVIG HAWAI'I AND THE PACIFIC WORLD: OR, HOW SURFING COLONIZED CALIFORNIA AND THE WORLD 

TR 9:40am-10:55am


On the surface this is a class about surfing.  But to understand surfing is to study the history of Hawai’i and of the sport which Hawai’ians developed and created surfing.  This course traces the early history of ancient Hawai’i, when navigating migrants traveled between Polynesia and Hawai’i until they ceased contact.  Traditional Hawai’i was governed by complex social and ritual systems, bound by the concept of kapu, or taboo.  The class analyzes the process by which Hawai’i went from being a united kingdom to missionary outpost and target of pineapple plantations, to a U.S. territory which specifically disenfranchised native Hawai’ians to the near suppression of surfing.  The resulting Hawai’ian Renaissance reshaped images of Hawai’i and surfing found willing converts in California.  Other topics include the history of surfing styles and competition, comparative surf breaks and shore cultures, California dreamin, the feeling you get when you hear the Eagles; beach bums; professional surf competitions and O’ahu North Shore culture; spam and plate lunch; the broader Pacific world; castaways; fur traders; tuna and canning industry; fisherman.      
HIS 291 MILLER THE SEA IN HISTORY

TR 11:20am-12:35pm

Since time immemorial people have traveled the oceans.  Populations, cultures, religions, plants and animals, commodities, and conquering armies and navies have all crossed the seas in momentous ways to shape the history of the world.  This course will take up the human experience with the sea from the first moments of voyaging across great bodies of water to the present day.  It will cover the principal seas and oceans.  It will examine the transnational transmission of peoples and ideas, the history of maritime networks and empires, and even the “urban” history of the sea by its interest in the great port cities of the past.  In modern times we will see how global economies and global wars can only be understood through their seaborne dimension.  History 291 will thus see the sea as a source of world-binding connectedness but also as a site of great naval struggles for supremacy.  Through lectures and discussions it will ask students to comprehend the sea as essential to our understanding of the past as well as critical to our future.

HIS 301 BACHIN MIAMI ENGAGEMENT: HISTORY, MEDIA, AND SOCIAL CHANGE

W 2:15pm-5:00pm

This team-taught, seminar-style course will examine the history, theory, and practice of civic engagement, community history, and social change in the United States, with an emphasis on Miami. We will look at four overlapping areas of interest: the meanings of civic engagement in American history; the roles of history and memory in shaping place and community; the role of the media in structuring stories about history and community; and grass-roots activism and its role in reinvigorating and reshaping public spheres in America. We will pay particular attention to the factors that have promoted inclusion and engagement, as well as those that have led to disenfranchisement and division. We will look at efforts by local, national, and even global activists to connect to communities large and small. And we will ask how the issues of memory, place, community, civil society, and global citizenship form a matrix around which to understand and shape broad-based collaboration among students, faculty, community residents, and civic organizations. In addition to classroom discussions and writing assignments, students will work collaboratively with a local community organization (remotely). The instructors will help pair students with organizations whose missions match the interests of the student.

HIS 312 CHATTERJEE FEMININITY, MASCULINITY, AND SEXUAL POLITICS IN INDIAN HISTORY

MWF 10:30am-11:20am

This course will be a thematic rather than chronological study of issues relating to gender and sex and the ways in which they have shaped the history of women and men’s lived experiences in India. We will focus on relations between women and men, constructions of the feminine and the masculine, sexual politics in the divergent narratives and contested histories of Indian womanhood as imagined and lived – the “Devi”(Goddess) or the “Dasi” (slave), the changing and dynamic nature of the roles and statuses of women and men in the spheres of politics, law, society, economy, and culture. We will weave a narrative of women and men’s lives by looking at both formal structures (inscribed in religious and legal texts) as well the customary lived experiences that often did not conform closely to formal dictates. To understand both formal social structure as well as experience and lived customs we will read a variety of multidisciplinary texts – primary historical documents written by both women and men, religious texts (Hindu, Muslim, Buddhist), selections from legal treatises, folktales, fiction, plays, autobiographies, memoirs, visuals, and films. Themes will be selected from ancient, medieval, and modern periods of Indian history, with primary focus on modern and contemporary developments. This is a writing credit course.

HIS 316 HALSEY MODERN CHINA

TR 11:20am-12:35pm

China has become one of the two most powerful countries in the world in the early twenty-first century, and some commentators believe that it may come to dominate the international system within several decades.  Yet during the past hundred and fifty years, it has witnessed three revolutions, fought at least eight major wars, and suffered the largest manmade famine in human history in the late 1950s.  How can we reconcile this tumultuous past with China’s growing stature on the world stage today?  This course examines China’s changing place in the global order from the late seventeenth century to the present, arguing that the origins of its current power lie as much in the country’s past as in the economic reforms of the past twenty-five years.  In the first third of this course, we will discuss China’s last ruling dynasty (1644-1911), addressing topics such as rebellion, the opium trade, imperialism, and foot-binding.  We will then examine the Republican era (1911-1949), which saw the rise of Chinese nationalism, the outbreak of civil war, and the invasion of Japan in 1937.  In the final third of the semester, we will discuss the communist revolution, Maoist policies such as the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution, and the rapid development of China’s economy since 1978. 

HIS 325 THOMAS THE EARLY MIDDLE AGES: EUROPE 450-1095

 TR 9:40am-10:55am

This course covers the history of Western Europe from the collapse of the Western Roman Empire to the beginning of the Crusades. There will also be some coverage of Byzantium and the Islamic world. Topics will include the loss and survival of Roman culture, the barbarians, the Carolingian Empire, the Vikings, the spread of Christianity, and relations with the emerging Islamic empire. There will be a main textbook and four or five other books containing sources written in the period. Grades will be based on class participation, midterm, final, and papers.

HIS 362 WHITE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION (1763-1783)

MWF 2:15pm-3:05pm

Beginning with an examination of British North America in the 1760s, this course considers the causes of the American Revolution and its significance for diverse segments of the population (various Native American nations, African Americans, and Euro-Americans of different ethnic backgrounds, religious proclivities, and political leanings).  Our scrutiny of this era will incorporate multiple historical vantage points: we will think of the American Revolution not only as a political event, but also as a social and cultural experience.  Our goal is to come closer to understanding what the revolution meant for the people who lived through it.

HIS 364 BERNATH CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION (1850-1877)

MW 11:45am-12:35

THIS COURSE REQUIRES A DISCUSSION SECTION

F 11:45am-12:35pm

F 1:00pm-1:50pm

This course explores the most cataclysmic event in American history. We will examine the Civil War as a revolutionary experience, an event that touched and radically transformed nearly every aspect of American life, and indeed, redefined the very meaning of the United States itself. This course will not be confined to battles and generals. While the military struggle will not be neglected, the primary focus of the course will be on the political, social, economic, and cultural aspects of the war. The Civil War has rightly been called “the crossroads of our being.” It fundamentally altered northern and southern society, ended the institution of slavery, and forever changed the course of American history. Today, the United States is still touched, and in many ways defined, by the legacy of the Civil War.

HIS 373 SPIVEY THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

TR 6:00pm-7:15pm

This course explores one of the most important social movements in the history of the American nation:  The Civil Rights Movement.  We will examine the heightening African-American consciousness and expectations after World War II; the organizational and strategic initiatives of the 1950s and 1960s; the tumultuous confrontations of the period; the leadership personalities and differing ideologies; the civil rights legislation and federal programs enacted; and the continuing opposition to the movement and its gains.  Lectures will be supplemented with video documentaries, photographs, news clippings, recorded speeches and music from the instructor’s vast collection.  

     The learning outcome goals of this course are to advance the students’ understanding of race relations and the African-American struggle and contribution to the United States of America, enhance cognitive, analytical, and critical thinking ability, and improve overall written and verbal communication skills.      

     The student’s grade for the course will be based on four book analyses of three pages each (12.5% each; 50%); participation in class discussion of required readings will count for extra credit; no midterm examination; a comprehensive essay final examination (50%) based upon lectures, documentaries, and readings.   

     * Typically, all courses that Professor Spivey teaches have a service-learning component.  That option has been temporarily suspended.    

     Contrary to Miami culture outside the University, class begins on time.  Neither will the professor waste precious class time taking attendance.  Students who have a habit of occasionally missing class are urged to spend those mini vacations in pleasurable but educational pursuits.  The student should keep in mind, however, that the comprehensive final examination is based on material covered in lectures, readings, and documentaries, and that class participation counts. In short, it is wise to attend all class sessions, be prepared, and participate.   We are studying a movement in which people gave their lives to the cause.  We will treat the subject with respect.    

HIS 447 GOFF GLOBAL HISTORY OF COMMUNISIM 

MW 10:30am-11:20am

THIS COURSE REQUIRES A DISCUSSION SECTION

F 10:30am-11:20am

We will evaluate the evolution of both Marxian theory and communist states and societies. How are Marxism-Leninism, Stalinism, Maoism, and other schools of thought different from one another and from the writings of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels? What is the history of communism and socialist internationalism in the 20th century and how does it intersect with the fight for national liberation and decolonization that spanned that era? We will discuss the Soviet Union, as well as other case studies from around the world to explore the diversity of the socialist world, understand what drew so many people to communism, and what communists aimed to achieve. 

HIS 501/602 ABAKA EUROPEAN EXPANSION IN AFRICA 1875-1945

T 4:20pm-7:05pm

This course deals with the European conquest, partition, and consolidation of spheres of influence in Africa from about 1850-1960. It examines the rationale for the European conquest of Africa, African responses to colonialism, the overthrow of colonialism, independence, and the post-independence period.  We will investigate specific issues such as the scramble and partition of Africa, the establishment of Indirect Rule (British), Assimilation and Association (French), and other administrative systems of the colonial period. In addition, we will take an in-depth look at the political economy of colonialism, the rise of nationalism, the formation of nationalist movements, and the struggle for independence. Why is the post-independence period characterized by civil wars, genocide, political and economic instability and why have many professionals left Africa for Europe and North America? These questions will be answered in the last segment of the course 

HIS 511/611 HALSEY STUDIES IN ASIAN HISTORY: COLONIALISM, IDENTITY, & DEVELOPMENT 

R 2:40pm-5:25pm

This research seminar uses works of history and literature to explore the origins, development, and collapse of European empires from 1500 to the present.  We will focus primarily on South Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Caribbean but also draw comparisons with Latin America, East Asia, and Southeast Asia. The course will develop a grand narrative that links overseas expansion in the early modern period (c. 1500-1800) to global capitalism but rejects economics as central to the creation of formal political and territorial empires after 1800.  Instead, we will argue that the primary significance of “modern” or territorial imperialism lay in the realm of culture, discourse, and identity formation for both Europeans and their colonial subjects. The first section of the course will evaluate the growth of plantations and trading posts from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries and examine the important changes in consumption, production, and finance that they inspired in European societies.  We will then trace the emergence of territorial colonies in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and appraise the linguistic, cultural, economic, and social impact of European rule on indigenous peoples.  During the final part of the course, we will assess the process of decolonization in the 1950s and 60s and conclude with the challenges of economic development and the post-colonial condition since independence.

HIS 511/611  CHATTERJEE INDIAN CINEMA: COLONIAL AND POST-COLONIAL NARRATIVES

MW 3:30pm-4:45pM

This course studies themes in colonial and post-colonial India through the lens of Indian cinema - Bollywood and the regional film industry. We will situate and frame the semester’s readings and film viewing around specific themes, with contextual framing of the history of Bollywood and regional cinema, their respective influence and limits in framing, valorizing or critiquing societal and cultural norms. The themes will relate to film-making in the colonial context and its relationship to nation-in-the making and nationalism, as well as post-colonial positioning and representations in Hindi and other regional language cinema toward issues of gender, sexuality, class, and caste identities. We will study the shaping of celluloid gods and goddesses and real lives of women and men, cinematic engagement with caste, class, and religious identities, consumption of sex, queering of it and its depiction in film, and their reception in society. We will discuss Indian cinema’s colonial and post-colonial engagement with modernity – through the lens of the Indian nation state and its women, as well as the nation and its “others”: identity politics based on religious exclusions and exclusivity, communal and secular anxieties in contemporary India as well as Bollywood’s reach globally in the Indian diaspora, especially
HIS 561/664 FRASER THE GREAT MIGRATIONS

W 2:15pm-5:00pm

In the decades between 1910 and 1970, millions of southerners left the rural South for the booming cities of the North and West, in what was inarguably one of the most significant demographic events of the 20th century. From the Chicago blues to the Bakersfield Sound; The Grapes of Wrath to Black Boy; the Black Panthers to the Southern Baptist Convention—the influence of the southern migrations can be seen everywhere in American society during these years. Rather than treating the experiences of black and white migrants separately, this course takes a comparative approach to these simultaneous and parallel migrations, focusing on the political and economic factors that drove out-migration from the South; the impact that southern migration had on race relations and labor markets in northern and western cities; the diasporic communities formed by southern migrants in their new homes; and the effects of the migrations on American culture and politics over the course of the 20th century.